<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=1552688705043844&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">

888-338-1776

Distance Learning Course Information Fall 2018

Theology of the Bible I (BIB203)

This course is a study of the major doctrines of the Christian faith. The doctrines covered are the doctrine of the Word of God, the doctrine of God, the doctrine of man, and the doctrine of sin. Students will learn the intricacies of the various important doctrines, compare the perspectives of different denominations, and make application of the doctrines to life.

Professor: Dr. Darrel Cox

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: None

More Info:

By the end of this course, you will be able to: 

  • Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of the various Old Testament literary genres and the significance of each genre for proper biblical interpretation (hermeneutics).

  • Demonstrate an introductory ability to study the primary text of Scripture within the context of its own unfolding story-line (exegesis).  

  • Define and demonstrate an understanding of specific terms and concepts central to foundational biblical and theological doctrines.

  • Demonstrate a knowledge of foundational biblical and theological doctrines and their significance to an individual’s relationship with God.

 

History of Western Civilization I (HIS223)

This course deals with the recurring political, economic, intellectual, diplomatic, and social themes in the history of the Western world from the time of the ancient Greeks until the middle of the seventeenth century.

Professor: Dr. Doug Favelo

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: None

More Info:

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Demonstrate mastery of important people, events, institutions, and ideas in the history of Western Civilization, beginning with Creation and the first organized civilizations in Mesopotamia and extending up to the end of the sixteenth century AD. This will be measured by classroom discussions and responses, three exams, and the research paper.

  • Express ideas clearly and persuasively, yet also with humility and graciousness. This will be measured by classroom discussions and responses, three exams, and the research paper.

  • Analyze primary sources and understand them within their historical context. This will be measured by classroom discussions and responses, three exams, and the research paper.

  • Integrate a biblical worldview with the major themes of Western history (such as religion, law, individualism, and government) while avoiding simplistic value judgments. This will be measured by classroom discussions and responses, three exams, and the research paper.

 

Western Literature II (LIT223)

This course will deal with representative masterpieces of Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Nineteenth-Century Realism and Naturalism and the Modern Age.

Professor: Dr. Cory Grewell

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: Western Literature I (LIT213)

More Info:

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Enhance their critical thinking and language skills in reading, writing, and speaking.

  • Understand place of Western literature, both ancient and modern, in the development and evaluation of Western intellectual and cultural traditions; additionally, they will understand the place of Western literature within the Western liberal arts tradition.

  • Integrate Western literature with a biblical worldview, especially as regards a broader Christian understanding of the liberal arts and sciences.

 

Biology (SCI223)

This course will provide a broad survey in the study of living organisms in addition to the history and philosophy of viewing the living world. Lectures will explore the fundamental scientific features of the living world including chemistry, cells, cell structures, classification of organisms, natural selection and the origin of life. Readings will focus on philosphical and historical themes in biology from Darwin to present.

Professor: Professor David Lee

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: None

More Info:

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Increase their knowledge of the methods related to the biological sciences, biological chemistry, basic terminology, and the most important people and events of 19th and 20th century biology.

  • Improve critical thinking skills by participating in the grammar and logic of the largest, most comprehensive science known to human history: the biological sciences.

  • Integrate a biblical worldview into the sciences while avoiding simplistic answers to questions of depth and subtlety in the sciences and theology. The student will also be able to compare the powerful models of naturalistic science to creationist and intelligent design alternatives.

  • Come to discern that scientific conclusions are a combination of both real world material data and (often unarticulated) philosophical assumptions. By the end of the course it is hoped that students will have the foundation to begin to distinguish between valid scientific observations and philosophically-driven conclusions.