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Distance Learning Course Information Fall 2017

 

Logic (CLA 213)

In this first-year course, you’ll consider the critical importance of the life of the mind in Christian discipleship, learn the nature and means of detecting different kinds of arguments and fallacies, and gain the intellectual and critical thinking skills to understand categorical and propositional formal systems. By taking this course, you’ll fulfill a core curriculum requirement for all PHC degree programs.

Professor: Dr. Matthew Roberts

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: None

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In this course, you will:

  • Understand the foundational role a Christian worldview plays in justifying the existence of logic as well as the practice of logical thinking, speaking, and writing

  • Recognize and use basic concepts of classical and propositional logic

  • Recognize common informal and formal fallacies and avoid using them in your own thought, speech, and writing

  • Express your thoughts clearly and concisely

  • Demonstrate proficiency with the terms and methodology of syllogistic and propositional logic

 

Economics for the Citizen (ECO 303)

This course develops an understanding of how markets work and builds to a survey of political economy. A key element is the presentation of the “economic way of thinking” and its goal is to help make better sense of the world in which we live.

Professor: Professor Nathan Russell

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: None

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In this course, you will:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the principles of economics

  • Demonstrate knowledge of a biblical and Christian perspective of economics 

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the importance and consequences of the principles of free-market, limited-government economics

  • Demonstrate an ability to apply economic principles to everyday life.

 

History of the United States I (HIS 203)

In this first-year course, you will learn about the recurring political, economic, intellectual, diplomatic, and social themes in the history of the United States, from colonial times through the Civil War, with an emphasis on American liberty. With guidance and instructor feedback, you’ll develop and apply critical and analytical thinking skills to the study of history and be exposed to historical methods of inquiry, all in a framework of biblical truth. This course fulfills a core curriculum requirement for all PHC degree programs.

Professor: Dr. Robert Spinney

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: None

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By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Demonstrate mastery of important people, events, institutions, and ideas from the historical past in America from colonial times until the Civil War

  • Express ideas clearly and persuasively, yet also with humility and graciousness

  • Analyze primary sources and understand them within their historical context.

  • Integrate a biblical worldview with the major themes of American history (such as religion, law, individualism, and government) while avoiding simplistic value judgment

 

History of Western Civilization I (HIS 223)

In this first-year course, you will learn about the recurring political, economic, intellectual, diplomatic, and social themes in the history of the Western world from the time of the ancient Greeks until the middle of the seventeenth century. You’ll examine early Israel, the Greek, Roman, and Byzantine empires, and the Reformation. You’ll also develop and apply critical and analytical thinking skills to the study of history and be exposed to historical methods of inquiry, all in a framework of biblical truth with personal guidance and instructor feedback. This course fulfills a core curriculum requirement for all PHC degree programs.

Professor: Dr. Lilia Anand

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: None

More info:

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Demonstrate mastery of important people, events, institutions, and ideas in the history of Western Civilization, beginning with Creation and the first organized civilizations in Mesopotamia and extending up to the mid-seventeenth century

  • Express ideas clearly and persuasively, yet also with humility and graciousness

  • Analyze primary sources and understand them within their historical context

  • Integrate a biblical worldview with the major themes of Western history (such as religion, law, individualism, and government) while avoiding simplistic value judgments