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Distance Learning Course Information Spring 2018

History of the United States II (HIS 213)*

In this first-year course students will learn about the recurring political, economic, intellectual, diplomatic, and social themes in the history of the United States, from 1865, the end of the Civil War, until the present. Students will also, with guidance and instructor feedback, develop and apply critical and analytical thinking skills to the study of history and be exposed to historical methods of inquiry, all in a framework of biblical truth. This course fulfills a core curriculum requirement for all PHC degree programs.

Professor: Dr. Robert Spinney

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: None

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By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Demonstrate mastery of important people, events, institutions, and ideas from the historical past in America from 1865 until the present

  • Express ideas clearly and persuasively, yet also with humility and graciousness

  • Analyze primary sources and understand them within their historical context

  • Integrate a biblical worldview with the major themes of American history (such as religion, law, individualism, and government) while avoiding simplistic value judgments

*Students are not required to have taken History of the United States I to register for History of the United States II in Spring 2017.

 

History of Western Civilization II (HIS 233)*

In this first-year course students will learn about the recurring political, economic, intellectual, diplomatic, and social themes in the history of the Western world from the middle of the seventeenth century until the present. Topics covered include, among other things, the Scientific Revolution, The Enlightenment, the French Revolution, the British Empire, and Modernity. Students will also, with guidance and instructor feedback, develop and apply critical and analytical thinking skills to the study of history and be exposed to historical methods of inquiry, all in a framework of biblical truth. This course fulfills a core curriculum requirement for all PHC degree programs.

Professor: Dr. Lilia Anand

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: None

More Info:

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Demonstrate mastery of important people, events, institutions, and ideas in the history of Western Civilization, beginning with the post-Reformation era (seventeenth-century) up to the present

  • Express ideas clearly and persuasively, yet also with humility and graciousness

  • Analyze primary sources and understand them within their historical context

  • Integrate a biblical worldview with the major themes of Western history (such as religion, law, individualism, and government) while avoiding simplistic value judgments

*Students are not required to have taken History of Western Civilization I to register for History of Western Civilization II in Spring 2017.

 

Western Literature I (LIT213)

In this course, students will read, analyze, discuss, and write about some of the great literary texts produced in the West from Antiquity through the Renaissance.  You will learn the tools of effective literary analysis and apply them to these texts, looking at the works in the contexts of the culture and intellectual history of their respective ages.  These tasks will be undertaken with an eye towards understanding and appreciating what these texts have to say to us about what the late Douglas Adams called, “Life, the Universe, and Everything.”  Put differently, students will attempt to glean a deeper understanding of God’s creation through aesthetic, moral, and spiritual contemplation of these works of imaginative literature.  This course fulfills a core curriculum requirement for all PHC degree programs.

Professor: Dr. Grewell

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: None

More Info: In this course, you will:

  • Enhance your critical thinking and language skills in reading, writing, and speaking
  • Understand place of Western literature, both ancient and modern, in the development and evaluation of Western intellectual and cultural traditions
  • Understand the place of Western literature within the Western liberal arts tradition
  • Integrate Western literature with a biblical worldview, especially as regards a broader Christian understanding of the liberal arts and sciences

 

Philosophy (PHI203)

In this freshman course, you will learn some of the fundamental skills of journalism—how to find, report, and write hard news and feature stories—and begin to apply a biblical worldview to the practice of journalism. By practicing basic journalism skills, you’ll consider why people read news in the first place, how acknowledging the truth of Christianity affects the practice of journalism, and how the role in society of a Christian journalist changes with the context in which he or she is writing. This course fulfills a requirement in the Journalism major and minor and is an open elective in other PHC majors.

Professor:  Dr. Matthew Roberts

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: None

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By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Identify and clearly explain the theories, ideas, and arguments of each of the thinkers presented in the course
  • Understand and clearly explain how these theories, ideas, and arguments undergird and influence the rest of the liberal arts
  • Understand and clearly explain how these theories, ideas, and arguments support or undermine a Christian worldview
  • Understand and clearly explain how these theories, ideas, and arguments influence contemporary practice in daily life, be it the personal or public, working-world or academic, secular or theological arenas
  • Clearly express an increased and improving ability to recognize the underlying philosophical assumptions at work in academic, political, religious, and personal discourse
These objectives will be accomplished using written papers, essays, and in-class discussion in which the student will communicate understanding and critically developed positions with precision and eloquence.


 

Journalism I (JRN 203)

In this freshman course, you will learn some of the fundamental skills of journalism—how to find, report, and write hard news and feature stories—and begin to apply a biblical worldview to the practice of journalism. By practicing basic journalism skills, you’ll consider why people read news in the first place, how acknowledging the truth of Christianity affects the practice of journalism, and how the role in society of a Christian journalist changes with the context in which he or she is writing. This course fulfills a requirement in the Journalism major and minor and is an open elective in other PHC majors.

Professor:  Dr. Les Sillars

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: None

More Info:

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Understand how news media interact with and help shape contemporary culture and politics

  • Explain the nature of news and why people seem to need it

  • Explain the major ways mass media messages tend to influence society

  • Develop competency in the core journalistic tasks (reporting, writing, editing)

  • Begin to develop a biblical view of the role of a Christian journalist in society by learning the ways Christians in journalism approach integrating faith and the requirements of the profession

  • Describe how the role of a Christian in journalism differs depending on the nature of the publication

  • Begin to develop and apply a biblical standard of journalistic ethics and a strong commitment to journalistic integrity by summarizing the major contemporary approaches to journalism ethics and comparing contemporary ethical standards with biblical teaching